Paul Andrews

Posts Tagged ‘blood doping’

This Day in Doping: Lance backs off self-testing; Rasmussen returns

In Lance's Chances, This Day In Doping on January 18, 2010 at 11:28 am

Lance Armstrong is dropping the idea of personal doping tests (our impression was that he never began them). And why not. He isn’t going to change anyone’s mind about the past by testing clean now. And as Joe Papp and others have revealed, there are so many ways to beat the system’s drug testing that it hardly makes sense for a pro to test himself. When so many pros in all sports lie about doping (see entries under “McGwire, Mark” and “Rodriguez, Alex”) with impunity, who is going to believe an athlete’s self-sponsored testing?

We continue to wonder why Lance does not join the BikePure pledge. It would be huge PR for him, and for the organization.

At 35, Michael Rasmussen is on the comeback trail. But tell me how a guy who was never found out, only suspected, in the first place is going to stay clean this time around.

This Day in Doping: Joe Papp on Cozy Beehive

In This Day In Doping on January 12, 2010 at 2:20 am

Over at Cozy Beehive, former pro cyclist Joe Papp unveils the secrets pros use to defeat anti-doping controls. It’s a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the cycling world’s subterfuge.

One point I’d like to see Joe or someone else close to pro cycling address: Just how much looking the other way goes on. I’ve discussed this before, that even if Tour officials found Contador or Lance doping, would they take action? The consequences to the sport would be beyond devastating. Better to just look the other way and beat up on the smaller guys in an attempt to 1) show you’re doing SOMEthing about doping and 2) present an illusion of cleaning up the sport.

We remain convinced that doping is a political and financial, not physical or athletic, issue, and must be dealt with on those terms.

This Day in Doping: Tom Zirbel’s positive test and denial

In This Day In Doping on December 28, 2009 at 3:19 pm

Bicycle.net quotes Zirbel to the effect that he doesn’t know what happened.

Particularly when a new year is coming, and you want to have hope, you wish you could believe a rider who says he was wronged. But you have to think that the monitoring system is set up in a rigorous enough way that a catch is a catch.

We’ll just have to wait.

This Day in Doping: The Joe Papp story

In This Day In Doping on December 14, 2009 at 12:40 pm

Great post on BikePure re Joe Papp’s reformed doper saga. We linked to Papp recently for perspective on the Kenny Williams fall from grace. Kenny could do worse than follow Joe’s lead in taking the pledge. And thanks to BikePure for providing an alternative vision to our doping-besotted sport.

This Day in Doping: Dr. Michele Ferrari

In This Day In Doping on December 11, 2009 at 4:05 pm

DrunkCyclist truth squads Dr. Ferrari on doping (via Cycling Weekly).

By the way, reading what Ferrari says in the Cycling Weekly story, you have to ask yourself: What was he smoking?

This day in drugs (again)

In Bicycle Racing, This Day In Doping on June 12, 2009 at 4:00 am

Thanks to Bicycle.net for bird-dogging the cycling-illegal substances links.

Self-injecting blood cheats pose a real problem for testing. This is where the cyclist freezes his own blood, saving it for a later date, and injects it on race day. Doing this with someone else’s compatible blood is generally detectable. With his own blood, well, that’s where it gets tricky. Supposedly technology is on the way to assist in this process.

Laurent Fignon, recently diagnosed with advanced cancer, on a possible link between doping and his diagnosis: “In those days everyone was doing it.” Really? Because Greg Lemond beat Fignon in the closest Tour ever, 1989, by 8 seconds. And Lemond is the guy who keeps agitating to clean up the sport without ever having acknowledged doping himself.

Bernard Hinault (without acknowledging doping himself), in Velo News: “The French have taken as much as the others. What is not normal is that they are not treated in the same manner as other sportsmen.”