Paul Andrews

Posts Tagged ‘lance armstrong’

This Day in Doping: Lance, Vaughters, Does doping matter? and football players

In This Day In Doping on February 8, 2010 at 2:32 pm

Jonathan Vaughters made a careless comment about Lance Armstrong, who tweeted revenge. We like to see Lance mad because it makes him a better cyclist. Perhaps he will stick Vaughters’ comment on his top tube. Every time his head starts to sag a bit from fatigue, he will read it there and all hell will break loose. If he does go to glory in the Tour de France 2010, Lance will have Jonathan in part to thank.

But some perspective is in order.

Lance and Vaughters are former teammates, so there’s that history. Then, a couple of years ago, a Vaughters IM about potential doping in the Tour wound up in a lawsuit involving Lance and got widely circulated.

In cycling circles, the word is that so little love is lost between Lance and Vaughters you couldn’t find it with the Hubble Telescope.

Even so, Vaughters shows he has lost little of his cycling form, at least when it comes to backpedaling … a bit, anyway.

To be continued, to be sure.

Bicycle.net: Does it really, in the overall scheme of things, when the universe is shrinking and expanding … does it really matter if cyclists cheat?

Cyclelicio.us: Judging from hit counts, cycling is way more drug-drenched than, say, pro football. Which we all knew, right? I mean, why would football players, starting in middle school, ever take steroids or whatever? What would there be in it for them?

BikePure.org: Anyone up for gene doping?

Waiting for LeMond…

In Bicycle Racing on February 5, 2010 at 1:51 am

Nice folo from VeloNews on the Trek-LeMond settlement. You have to read between the lines here. From the judge’s questions, it looked virtually certain that Lance’s doping suspicions would be raised in the trial (Lance’s ex was barred by her attorney from answering questions during deposition about his doping).

That would have put Trek under enormous pressure from Lance to keep him out of all this at a time when the Comeback Kid least wants negative publicity.

It’s probably an overstatement to suggest that Trek caved, but put it this way: Had Trek held the upper hand, there probably would be a gag on Greg against discussing any Armstrong connection.

As the VeloNews piece makes clear, there is not.

So we’ll continue to wait for word from LeMond re Lance (memo to @greglemond: Whatever you feel about Lance, the guy knows how to use Twitter!). As we stated earlier, our preference would be a burying of the hatchet so these kings of the road could work together to promote cycling’s future in America.

LeMond “settles” with Trek; what about Lance?

In Bicycling on February 2, 2010 at 3:00 am

Lost in the white-out coverage of Greg LeMond’s legal settlement with Trek so far has been the issue of why the lawsuit occurred in the first place.

LeMond believed that Trek had stopped supporting his line in deference to Lance Armstrong, who was out for revenge against LeMond for suggesting that Armstrong was tainted by doping.

But in the “we’re all friends now” coverage of the case settlement, the backstory never made it to press. Does the “friendship” include a reconciliation with Armstrong? Are we finally going to see America’s titans of cycling bury the hatchet and work together for the sport’s future?

We at Bike Intelligencer wish it would happen. There’s much to admire about both of these competitors, including their charitable work.

But we’re not holding our breath. Somehow the media “amnesia” over the lawsuit’s origin suggests that the subject still is sore, or at the very least not closed.

Last fall LeMond told the New York Daily News (whose piece should be required reading for anyone interested in cycling doping):

“This is not just a contract dispute,” LeMond counters. “It’s about defending myself from people that are out to destroy everything I’ve done in cycling… I want to hold John Burke accountable. I want to hold Lance Armstrong accountable.”

Within the coming days and weeks and months, we should get an idea of how successful LeMond was, and how satisfied he really truly is with this settlement.

News Cycle: Crashed bike, e-bike, Lance’s bike, stolen bike & more

In Bicycle advocacy, Lance's Chances, News Cycle, Rider Down on February 1, 2010 at 1:54 am

So we have a question here. Exactly how cautious does a cyclist have to be to prevent a driver from turning left in front of him or her? We almost got run down today in Aptos in that very scenario, so we’d like, really, we’d love to know. You wonder if this cop would tell a gunshot victim to be especially careful not to get in the way of bullets.

In Idaho they’re still cranking along on the “Preserve Our Trails” mountain-biking license plate. Good on ‘em!

Pinarello Dogma worth “thousands and thousands” brazenly stolen from an Issaquah bike shop that should have known better.

BikingBis, who’s been on the case since the start, updates the 3-feet-please movement for 2010.

Jacquie Phelan: The A Side and the B Side of the “Modern San Franciscan”…aboard a bike of course. But first look at the photo.

Commute Seattle off and running…er carpooling…and biking!

What about Ennnn Ohhhhh don’t you understand?

Even with this on his side, the answer is still the same.

On the rise: The electric bike! I think of e-bikes the way I think of e-books: Nice implementation but Old School is better. Still, there’s no denying e-bikes are on the upswing. Battery technology is getting so insanely light and malleable that you can barely find the batteries on the bike any more. It’s only going to get better. In my dotage I may come to actually appreciate the things.

News Cycle: Haiti relief, Bike RV, Lance’s chances & more

In Lance's Chances, News Cycle on January 27, 2010 at 1:35 am

Guy gets so excited about Google Street View camera he crashes his bike. I’ve heard of more riders losing their iPhones exactly this way.

In 2009, the Dutch bought 1.3 million bicycles.

Which is 1.3 million fewer than Americans bought in the first quarter of 2009.

No longer does Preston Peterson have an excuse to show up at the trailhead with his trashed-out RV.

Craigslist continues to be the most successful weapon of choice against bike theft.

Adageo Energy Pro Cycling Team jerseys are being sold to benefit Haiti.

Even better, a 7-year-old cyclist is raising funds for Haiti by riding around his local park.

Twisted Spoke has scoped out early odds on Lance winning the Tour.

Today’s inspiration.

News Cycle: Zoic resuscitates, Top bike-club names, Bike rear-view mirror safety sticker & more

In Bicycle advocacy, Lance's Chances, News Cycle, Rider Down on January 26, 2010 at 1:32 am

BikingBis: Top bike-club names. Can’t argue with Gene on these. We did have the privilege of serving with a 1980s club founded by the estimable epicure, Bradford O’Connor, in celebration of one of his favorite beverages. It was called Team Green Death, in reference to the suitably toxic Rainier Brewery product, which served as official libation for all team meetings, gatherings and functions, including the annual sponsored Century Ride. TGD served its purpose and passed on, but the audacious team jersey lives in our attic somewhere.

Trial starts tomorrow of woman accused of mowing down cyclists while on her cell phone.

Lance says he thinks he can win the Tour de France again. “I might be a fool,” he acknowledges. While we chuckle at the thought Lance might be a fool, and especially at the notion he might really think that, we also know he has almost no chance to win another Tour. But as we’ve said, till someone else with a scintilla of charisma steps forward to lead the sport, Lance might as well chat up his chances.

Early Zoic (circa 2004) clothing was trend-setting and cool. Then the parent company lost interest and Zoic got expensive and precious. Now Eric Swenson and Paul Wyandt have bought Zoic, and we’re expecting great things.

BikePortland has report on a clever bike safety sticker.

A Wide Open Tour de France 2010?

In Bicycle Racing, Lance's Chances, This Day In Doping on January 25, 2010 at 3:46 am

Yes it’s early, but we continue to see signs that this year’s Tour de France is shaping up as a real bike race (as opposed to a single team of prima donnas controlling a docile peloton). We think it’s good for the sport, especially because we may be spared endless Clash of Titans bloviating re Lance and Alberto. With a slew of contenders in the mix, maybe this year’s Tour will have actual, true, real, what’s the expression … suspense?

Olympic champion Samuel Sanchez says he’s gonna try to win.

Aussie “Tour Down Under” champion Andre Greipel wants a go, mate.

His coach says Lance is ahead of last year’s training (when he eventually took third in the Tour). Or is this just something to say every year to juice the buzz?

Last year’s winner Alberto Contador looks to put an early hurt on the peloton in Paris-Nice.

Don’t forget our personal favorite, Andy Schleck (and brother Frank).

And we’ve already talked about the Doper Reunion aspect. Whatever else you can say about these cheats, they can still ride.

We’ll be watching Vegas odds on this one with intense interest.

Dirt v. Road: Who’s on top?

In Mountain Biking on January 21, 2010 at 1:30 am

Who’s the stronger rider: Mountain biker or roadie? At Bike Intelligencer, drawing from years of suffering in both disciplines, we’ve often opined for the former. We know personally that, despite having done numerous double centuries, triathlons and races during our nearly six decades aboard two wheels, our hardest rides by far have been the six-to-eight hour mountain biking epics we’ve tackled all over the West.

Compared to road riding, MTBing offers little in the way of coasting, spinning or drafting. Riding twisting trails up and down requires far more upper body strength and overall muscular compliance than turning pedals 90 times a minute, even if it’s hour after hour on 100-mile or more rides. The time spent anaerobic on a typical mountain bike ride far exceeds the amount on an equivalent road ride.

See what he can do in a pair of baggies...

But one needn’t rely on our personal testimony. Just compare the record: Top mountain bikers have made the switch to road with instant success. Cadel Evans, Michael Rasmussen, Floyd Landis, Ryder Hesjedal — all have had stellar road careers after transitioning from mountain biking.

Now name one roadie who has done anything in MTB. The King himself, Lance Armstrong, gave it a go one partial season, with undistinguished results. The only mention of mountain biking in Lance’s Wikipedia entry has to do with (alas) George W. Bush.

All of this is by way of noting that Mountain Bike Action magazine’s March 2010 issue (pp. 22-24) has a clever faceoff between our favorite roadie, Andy Schleck, last year’s Tour runnerup, and mountain biking whiz kid Burry Stander, a 22-year-old South African XC champ. We’ll let you consult the magazine for results, but we liked the way MBA set up the competition.

All that said, of course it’s preposterous to postulate that one discipline is somehow superior athletically to another. Michael Jordan couldn’t hit a major league pitcher: Does that somehow make him less a basketball great? Neither Andy nor Burry would stand a chance against Brian Lopes or Steve Peat on the mountain. It doesn’t diminish their stature in road and cross-country one whit.

There’s really only one time the comparison becomes useful, and that’s when roadies start getting uppity and full of themselves. Not that we ever did when we were a roadie, but you know what we mean…

This Day in Doping: Lance backs off self-testing; Rasmussen returns

In Lance's Chances, This Day In Doping on January 18, 2010 at 11:28 am

Lance Armstrong is dropping the idea of personal doping tests (our impression was that he never began them). And why not. He isn’t going to change anyone’s mind about the past by testing clean now. And as Joe Papp and others have revealed, there are so many ways to beat the system’s drug testing that it hardly makes sense for a pro to test himself. When so many pros in all sports lie about doping (see entries under “McGwire, Mark” and “Rodriguez, Alex”) with impunity, who is going to believe an athlete’s self-sponsored testing?

We continue to wonder why Lance does not join the BikePure pledge. It would be huge PR for him, and for the organization.

At 35, Michael Rasmussen is on the comeback trail. But tell me how a guy who was never found out, only suspected, in the first place is going to stay clean this time around.

This Day in Doping: Joe Papp on Cozy Beehive

In This Day In Doping on January 12, 2010 at 2:20 am

Over at Cozy Beehive, former pro cyclist Joe Papp unveils the secrets pros use to defeat anti-doping controls. It’s a fascinating behind-the-scenes look at the cycling world’s subterfuge.

One point I’d like to see Joe or someone else close to pro cycling address: Just how much looking the other way goes on. I’ve discussed this before, that even if Tour officials found Contador or Lance doping, would they take action? The consequences to the sport would be beyond devastating. Better to just look the other way and beat up on the smaller guys in an attempt to 1) show you’re doing SOMEthing about doping and 2) present an illusion of cleaning up the sport.

We remain convinced that doping is a political and financial, not physical or athletic, issue, and must be dealt with on those terms.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.